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Gas Welding Processes

oxy fuel welder

Oxy-fuel welding (oxy acetylene welding)

See main article on oxyacetylene welding

Oxy-fuel welding, also known as oxy-acetylene welding, is one of the oldest and most versatile welding processes, but in recent years it has become less popular in industrial applications. It is still widely used for welding pipes and tubes, as well as repair work. The equipment is relatively inexpensive and simple, generally employing the combustion of acetylene in oxygen to produce a welding flame temperature of more than 3000 degrees C. The flame, since it is less concentrated than an electric arc, causes slower weld cooling, which can lead to greater residual stresses and weld distortion, though it eases the welding of high alloy steels. Other methods, such as air acetylene welding, oxygen hydrogen welding, and pressure gas welding are quite similar, generally differing only in the type of gases used. A similar process, generally called oxy-fuel cutting, is used to cut metals.

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Welding Encyclopedia


1 History of Welding

2 Arc Welding processes

2.2 Gas welding

2.3 Resistance welding

3 Welding costs

4 Safety issues