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Welding safety issues

Welding, without the proper precautions, can be a dangerous and unhealthy practice. However, with the use of new technology and proper protection, the risks of injury and death associated with welding can be greatly reduced. Because many common welding procedures involve an open electric arc or flame, the risk of burns is significant. To prevent them, welders wear heavy leather gloves and protective long sleeve jackets to avoid exposure to extreme heat and flames. Additionally, the brightness of the weld area leads to a condition called "arc eye" in which ultraviolet light causes the inflammation of the cornea and can burn the retinas of the eyes. Helmets with dark face plates are worn to prevent this exposure, and in recent years, new helmet models have been produced that feature a face plate that self-darkens upon exposure to high amounts of UV light. Welders are also often exposed to gases, such as nitrogen oxides, ozone and carbon monoxide, and fumes that can prove dangerous if ventilation is inadequate. Furthermore, the use of compressed gases and flames in many welding processes pose an explosion and fire risk if proper precuations are not taken, including the prevention of excess oxygen in the air and keeping combustible materials away from the workplace.

Licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. Material from the Wikipedia article "Welding". This article  is from Wikipedia, the leading user-contributed encyclopedia. It may not have been reviewed by professional editors (see full disclaimer)

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Welding Encyclopedia


1 History of Welding

2 Arc Welding processes

2.2 Gas welding

2.3 Resistance welding

3 Welding costs

4 Safety issues